Sunday, July 2, 2017

A Certain Blue of the Sea

The history of art is inseparable from the history of colour and in this history, blue has always been associated with vastness, ‘blue has no dimensions. It is beyond dimensions,’ as Yves Klein described.
Ultramarine blue derives from lapis lazuli, a gemstone that for centuries could only be found in a single mountain range in Afghanistan. For hundreds of years, the cost of lapis lazuli rivaled even the price of gold.

Humans with reduced blue sensitivity have difficulty identifying differences between blue and yellow, violet and red and blue and green. To these humans our ecosphere appears as generally red, pink, black, white, grey and turquoise. Blue appears green and yellow appears violet or light grey for humans with tritanopia, namely, for those who lack blue cone cells.

Visual perception is one of the most important mediums for our acquisition of knowledge and for our experience of our environment, of the physical world including our own bodies and others, while, colour is one of the most dominant components of our perception. Nevertheless, the physical world and the world of objects do not contain colour and aren’t coloured as we experience them. Colour isn’t a physical property of objects, thus, our blood is not red, the sea isn’t blue, the trees aren’t green…
The colour appearance of an object can be changed by changing the colour of light that shines on it and the colour of visible light depends on its wavelength. White light is composed of all of the colours of the rainbow, because it contains all wavelengths, and it is described as polychromatic light. Colour glows with the light of the radiant sun and creates a relentless spectacle of sheer visibility, of an intense luminosity that can even be blinding.

Drawing from our different perceptions of colour, colour vision deficiency and even “achromatopsia” (total colour blindness), the 40 participating artists of the Group Exhibition will trace the different interpretations of the notion of colour as sensation, visual and sensorial experience, psychological property of visual experiences, mental property, representation and construction of the brain.

Dimitris Zouroudis ~ Katerina Zacharopoulou ~ Antonis Tsakiris ~ Adonis Volanakis ~ Kostis Velonis ~ Filippos Tsitsopoulos ~ Danae Stratou ~ Aggelos Skourtis ~ Christina Sgouromiti ~ George Sampsonidis ~ Nana Sachini ~ Nikos Navridis ~ Marina Provatidou ~ Artemis Potamianou~ Brigitte Polemis ~ Hara Piperidou ~ Aemilia Papafilippou ~ Antonia Papatzanaki~ Nikos Papadopoulos
~ Margarita Myrogianni ~ Maro Michalakakos ~ Leon Michail ~ Iliodora Margellos ~ Christos Kostoulas (Captain) ~ Esmeralda Kosmatopoulos ~ Peggy Kliafa ~ Maria Katrantzi ~ Irini Karayannopoulou ~ Nikos Kanarelis ~ Sofia Housou ~ Aspassio Haronitaki ~ Cleopatra Haritou ~ Yioula Hadjigeorgiou ~ Kleio Gizeli ~ Maria Georgoula ~ Sandra Christou ~ Venia Bechraki ~ Rania Bellou ~ Evgenia Apostolou ~ Lydia Andrioti

Curator: Sozita Goudouna
Ionian Parliament ~ Island of Corfu

4-31 July